Appalachian Power: Construction on final phase of $110m transmission project to begin Sept. 23

Appalachian Power said that after upgrading the power line, it plans to remove a separate, temporary power line located between the Brooks Street and Washington Street substations; that work is expected to be completed by the end of the year

American Electric Power’s Appalachian Power on Sept. 10 said that it has begun the final phase of construction for the $110m Charleston Area Improvements Project that is designed to ensure electric reliability in the Charleston, W.Va., area.

The final phase of the project involves upgrading the company’s transmission line beginning near Wertz Avenue and continuing southeast toward Oakridge Road, Appalachian Power said, adding that work will continue south, crossing Interstate 64/77 and the Kanawha River.

Crews will begin construction on the section across Interstate 64/77 and the river on Sept. 23, the company noted, adding that it expects to conclude the power line upgrade by the end of November. Appalachian Power said that after upgrading the power line, it plans to remove a separate, temporary power line located between the Brooks Street and Washington Street substations; that work is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

As noted in a project fact sheet, the project involves building a new substation, upgrading and expanding two existing substations, as well as upgrading about five miles of existing transmission line.

As TransmissionHub reported, according to a company spokesperson, four miles of line will be double circuit 138/69 kV, while one mile will be double circuit 138 kV. The voltage of the new substation that is part of that project is 138/46 kV, the spokesperson said.

The economic development in Charleston has increased the need for a modern transmission system, the fact sheet noted, adding that the upgrades will ensure continued reliable service to the residential, commercial, and industrial customers in the area, while building an electric system capable of handling the growing power demand.