Rocky Mountain Power to build Conestoga substation in Wyoming

PacifiCorp d/b/a Rocky Mountain Power on March 11 filed with the Wyoming Public Service Commission a notice stating that it intends to build the new 34.5-kV Conestoga substation.

The company said that it requests a determination from the commission that construction of the new substation does not require a certificate of public convenience and necessity (CPCN) because W.S. § 37-2-205(a) provides that a CPCN is not required “for any extension within or to territory already served by it, necessary in the ordinary course of business” and the commission’s rule, Chapter 3, Section 21(b)(i) only provides that notice to the commission is required for substations 69 kV and above, as well as for transmission lines 69 kV and above that are greater than three miles in length.

Discussing the project, the company said that an existing large industrial customer plans on adding about 32 MW of new load to the company’s system. The company said that it determined that in order to serve the proposed load increase, construction of the new Conestoga substation located immediately adjacent to the existing Blacks Fork 230-kV substation is necessary, along with rebuilding about 3,000 feet of existing 34.5-kV feeder distribution line – from the Blacks Fork substation – and new construction of about 5,000 feet of new 34.5-kV feeder distribution line – from the Conestoga substation.

The Conestoga substation construction would include one new transformer to step down the voltage from 230 kV to 34.5 kV; three new 230-kV circuit breakers arranged in a ring-bus configuration; one new feeder bay and two new 34.5-kV circuit breakers; two new primary meters; and a differential protection scheme to allow feeders to operate in parallel if necessary.

The company said that a CPCN is not required for construction of the new substation, construction of about 5,000 feet of new 34.5-kV feeder distribution line, and rebuild of about 3,000 feet of existing 34.5-kV feeder distribution line because it does not meet the definition of a major utility facility and it falls under the exception that allows for construction to serve within its certificated service territory, which is necessary in the ordinary course of business.

Among other things, the company said that it requests that the commission inform it of the commission’s determination by March 31.

About Corina Rivera-Linares 2807 Articles
Corina Rivera-Linares, chief editor for TransmissionHub, has covered the U.S. power industry for the past 13 years. Before joining TransmissionHub, Corina covered renewable energy and environmental issues, as well as transmission, generation, regulation, legislation and ISO/RTO matters at SNL Financial. She has also covered such topics as health, politics and education for weekly newspapers and national magazines. She can be reached at corinar@pennwell.com.