CECC seeks approval in Arkansas of about 14 miles of new 161-kV line

Carroll Electric Cooperative Corporation (CECC) on Feb. 18 filed with the Arkansas Public Service Commission an application for a certificate of environmental compatibility and public need in order to build and operate about 14 miles of new 161-kV transmission line between CECC’s planned Green Forest substation in Carroll County, Ark., and Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation’s (AECC) planned Long Creek substation in Stone County, Mo.

The line would originate from the Green Forest substation located near Green Forest, Ark., and extend north through Carroll County to the Long Creek substation near the existing switch structure of CECC’s JJ Tap 69-kV transmission line, about two miles east of Blue Eye, Mo., in Stone County. CECC added that the design of the proposed electrical facilities would be CECC’s standard insulated 161-kV overhead, three-phase, shielded transmission line design, primarily using a Delta conductor configuration on single-pole, steel structures within a new 100-foot right of way (ROW).

The proposed route exits the Green Forest substation to the north and extends for about 2,300 feet, where it turns north northwest and extends about 740 feet. At that point, CECC added, the proposed route turns north and extends about 3,700 feet, crossing County Road 802, to a point where it then turns east northeast and extends about 3,600 feet to a point where it then turns northeast and extends 5,800 feet. At that point, the proposed route bears about 10 degrees west of north and extends about 2,850 feet, crossing County Road 808, to a point 150 feet west of County Road 810, where it then turns north and extends about 7,900 feet, crossing County Roads 810 and 814, to a point where it then turns north northeast and extends about 1,300 feet to the South line of Section 7, T-20-N, R-22-W.

At that point, CECC added, the proposed route bears north and extends about 7,700 feet, crossing Arkansas Highway 311, to a point where it turns north northwest and extends about 4,800 feet to a point on the west side of Yocum Creek where it turns northwest and extends about 3,300 feet, where it turns north and extends about 9,350 feet, crossing County Road 614.

At that point, the proposed route turns east and extends about 2,350 feet to a point where it turns north and extends about 9,100 feet, crossing on the east side of the intersection of County Roads 626 and 628, to a point near the south ROW of Arkansas Highway 311, where the proposed route turns north northeast and extends about 700 feet, crossing Arkansas Highway 311, to a point where it turns north and extends about 1,600 feet.

At that point, CECC added, the proposed route turns northeast and extends about 1,950 feet to a point about 85 feet south of the Arkansas-Missouri state line, where it then turns north northeast and extends about 2,100 feet, crossing over the Arkansas-Missouri state line, and over Missouri Highway EE, to a point where it then turns north northwest and extends about 1,750 feet to a point about 500 feet southeast of Brush Creek Road.

At that point, the proposed route turns northeast and extends about 700 feet to a point where it then turns east northeast and extends about 1,000 feet and enters the AECC Long Creek substation, located between Brush Creek Road and Dew Drop Road, two miles east of Missouri Highway 13 at Blue Eye, Mo., CECC said.

The proposed route was selected based on a routing analysis study taking into consideration all alternative routes, feedback gathered from the public at an open house event, and discussions with landowners directly affected by the proposed route, CECC said.

The single-pole design would be installed with direct buried or drilled pier foundations, and the electrical conductor would be 1272 MCM 45/7, aluminum conductor steel-reinforced (ACSR) code named Bittern, with a rated operating capability of 359 MVA at 161 kV. CECC also said that conductors would typically be attached to the poles with polymer/fiberglass type braced post insulators to insulate and support the conductors.

The proposed electrical facilities are needed to address voltage fluctuations and resulting low voltages that occur in the northeastern area of CECC’s service territory; regions located in northeastern Carroll County and south of Table Rock Lake in Stone County. CECC added that the proposed electrical facilities also address concerns of reliability and regional capacity in areas where CECC has seen a growth in energy demand.

The estimated cost of the proposed electrical facilities is $9m, which includes the costs associated with clearing and building the primarily single steel pole transmission structures, CECC said.

Among other things, the filing noted that pending commission approval, CECC plans to begin clearing in 4Q19; construction would begin in early 2020, and complete prior to the end of 2020.

About Corina Rivera-Linares 2807 Articles
Corina Rivera-Linares, chief editor for TransmissionHub, has covered the U.S. power industry for the past 13 years. Before joining TransmissionHub, Corina covered renewable energy and environmental issues, as well as transmission, generation, regulation, legislation and ISO/RTO matters at SNL Financial. She has also covered such topics as health, politics and education for weekly newspapers and national magazines. She can be reached at corinar@pennwell.com.