Dominion Energy Virginia seeks approval of rebuild projects in Virginia

Virginia Electric and Power (Dominion Energy Virginia) on June 18 filed with the Virginia State Corporation Commission an application seeking approval of the Lanexa-Northern Neck Line #224 230-kV transmission line partial rebuild projects.

The company said that in order to maintain the structural integrity and reliability of its transmission system in compliance with mandatory NERC reliability standards, it proposes to rebuild, entirely within existing right of way (ROW), four separate segments of its existing Lanexa-Northern Neck line in King and Queen, King William, and New Kent counties based on the condition of the foundations and structures.

Dominion Energy Virginia said that in the four segments, it proposes to:

  • Remove and replace nine structures and foundations spanning the Pamunkey River and crossing adjacent tidal marshlands (the Pamunkey River Rebuild). The purpose of that work is to remove and replace six double-circuit “COR-TEN” lattice structures, one tubular 3-pole steel structure, and two wood H-frame structures that are currently carrying a single transmission circuit, and foundations spanning the Pamunkey River and crossing adjacent tidal marshlands due to the deteriorating condition of the “COR-TEN” lattice structures’ foundations. The length of the existing ROW to be used for the Pamunkey River Rebuild is about 1.7 miles long from the northern side of Sweet Hall Road to the southern side of Old Sweet Hall Ferry Crossing
  • Remove and replace seven structures and foundations spanning the Mattaponi River and crossing adjacent tidal marshlands (the Mattaponi River Rebuild). The purpose of that work is to remove and replace three double-circuit “COR-TEN” lattice structures, two tubular 3-pole steel structures, and two wood H-frame structures that are currently carrying a single transmission circuit and a single distribution circuit, and foundations spanning the Mattaponi River and crossing adjacent tidal marshlands due to the deteriorating condition of the “COR-TEN” lattice structures’ foundations. The length of the existing ROW to be used for the Mattaponi River Rebuild is about 1.3 miles long from the eastern side of Court House Landing Road to the northern side of Wakema Road 
  • Remove and replace two double-circuit “COR-TEN” lattice structures and two adjacent wood H-frame structures, which are currently carrying a single transmission circuit, and foundations on the existing 230-kV Line #224 crossing I-64 in New Kent County west of the intersection of I-64 and Route 3 (the I-64 Rebuild). The length of the existing ROW to be used for the I-64 Rebuild is 0.5 mile long from the northern side of Stage Road to the eastern side of Good Hope Road
  • Remove and replace one double-circuit “COR-TEN” lattice structure, which is currently carrying one transmission circuit for Line #224 and another for Line #2016, and foundation, with two double deadend 2-pole structures and foundations (the Diascund Rebuild), located east of North Waterside Drive, on the western bank of the Diascund Creek Reservoir

Collectively, that work in the four segments is referred to as the Line #224 Partial Rebuild Projects, or the rebuild projects, the company noted.

The rebuild projects would replace aging infrastructure that is at the end of its service life in order to comply with the company’s mandatory transmission planning criteria, thereby enabling the company to maintain the overall long-term reliability of its transmission system, and to maintain the overall generating capabilities of the system, the company said.

The conceptual cost of the Line #224 Partial Rebuild Projects, which assumes completion by May 2021, is about $30.7m (2018 dollars), the company said, adding that about $1m of that total is for substation- and distribution-related costs.

Among other things, the company said that given the availability of existing ROW and the statutory preference given to the use of existing ROWs – and because additional costs and environmental impacts would be associated with the acquisition and construction of new ROW – the company did not consider any alternate routes requiring new ROW for the rebuild projects.

About Corina Rivera-Linares 3063 Articles
Corina Rivera-Linares, chief editor for TransmissionHub, has covered the U.S. power industry for the past 15 years. Before joining TransmissionHub, Corina covered renewable energy and environmental issues, as well as transmission, generation, regulation, legislation and ISO/RTO matters at SNL Financial. She has also covered such topics as health, politics, and education for weekly newspapers and national magazines. She can be reached at clinares@endeavorb2b.com.