Hearing scheduled for April 5 in Arkansas on proposed $15m project

A hearing will be held on April 5 in the hearing room of the Arkansas Public Service Commission building in Little Rock, Ark., concerning Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation’s (AECC) application for a certificate of public convenience and necessity requesting authority to build, own, and operate certain transmission facilities in Monroe and Lee counties in Arkansas, according to a Feb. 7 order signed by an administrative law judge.

In its December 2017 application, AECC requested a commission order by June 1, approving the CCN for a new 23-mile, 69-kV transmission line to serve AECC’s member, Woodruff Electric Cooperative Corporation (WECC). The project has an estimated cost of $15m, AECC said, adding that it would pay for the construction using cash out of general funds.

AECC said that the proposed line is required by the public convenience and necessity to improve service reliability to WECC and its members in order to better serve its expanding loads in the two counties.

The proposed line would connect AECC’s Holly Grove substation to AECC’s Monroe substation, and would complete a transmission loop extending from AECC’s Keevil, to Holly Grove, to Monroe substations. If approved, AECC added, the proposed line would provide WECC with enhanced reliability for those retail consumers served out of the Holly Grove and Monroe substations.

According to the direct testimony on behalf of AECC of Curtis Warner, director – Compliance and Support Department, AECC, the line would originate at the Holly Grove substation, located in Monroe County, about seven miles south of the town of Holly Grove on Arkansas Highway 17. The termination point of the line would be the Monroe substation, located on the north side of the town of Monroe in Lee County.

According to the direct testimony on behalf of AECC of Forest Kessinger, director of Transmission Coordination and Planning for AECC, the line would provide a second electrical feed to the Holly Grove substation whereby that substation load would be “picked up” out of the Monroe substation using the proposed line. If a fault occurs between the Monroe Tap to Monroe substation line, load would be picked up through the Holly Grove substation using the proposed line. Having two transmission feeds to the Holly Grove and Monroe substations would provide materially faster service restoration in the event of an outage.

The proposed line has a desired in-service date of March 1, 2020, and would be built using a three-phase, shielded, single-circuit, 69-kV transmission line of single-pole construction, AECC said. The right of way (ROW) for the proposed line would be 100 feet wide and traverse mostly agricultural lands. AECC also said that if the proposed line is built along the proposed route, then there would be no significant impact on aesthetic pleasure, health, safety, the environment, or any existing or planned property uses, AECC said.

According to the Feb. 7 order, the direct testimony, exhibits, or documentary evidence to be filed by the commission’s General Staff and any intervenors are to be filed by Feb. 15. Also, any rebuttal testimony, exhibits, or documentary evidence to be filed by AECC are to be filed by March 1. The order added that any sur-rebuttal testimony, exhibits, or documentary evidence to be filed by staff and any intervenors are to be filed by March 15. Any sur-rebuttal testimony, exhibits, or documentary evidence to be filed by AECC are to be filed by March 22, the order noted.

About Corina Rivera-Linares 3067 Articles
Corina Rivera-Linares, chief editor for TransmissionHub, has covered the U.S. power industry for the past 15 years. Before joining TransmissionHub, Corina covered renewable energy and environmental issues, as well as transmission, generation, regulation, legislation and ISO/RTO matters at SNL Financial. She has also covered such topics as health, politics, and education for weekly newspapers and national magazines. She can be reached at clinares@endeavorb2b.com.