New York ISO looks at compliance with the Clean Power Plan

Posted to the New York ISO website on June 29 were some initial study results on how New York can comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s CO2-reducing Clean Power Plan (CPP), which is currently subject to a U.S. Supreme Court stay pending appeals court review.

The study is from Peter Carney of the Electric System Planning Working Group.

The study outlines five scenarios for future power generation, none of which include coal as a viable power plant fuel for the future:

  • BAU: Ginna and Fitzpatrick nuclear units in-service. CO2 allowance price is zero for non Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) states; RGGI CO2 Cap is kept flat post-2020 at 78.175 million ton for 2024 and 2030.
  • Flat Cap: Ginna and Fitzpatrick nuclear units retired before 2024; CPP is a constraining factor in the design of this scenario for non-RGGI states in the remaining scenarios; RGGI CO2 Cap is kept flat post-2020 at 78.175 million ton for 2024 and 2030.
  • Declining Cap (DecCap): Ginna and Fitzpatrick nuclear units retired before 2024; CPP is a constraining factor in non-RGGI states; RGGI CO2 emissions are capped by a 2.5% annual reduction post-2020, i.e. 70.646 million tons for 2024 and 60.690 million tons for 2030.
  • High Renewable Energy (HiRE): Ginna, Fitzpatrick, and Indian Point nuclear units retired before 2024; CPP is a constraining factor in non-RGGI states; RGGI CO2 emissions are kept flat post-2020 at 78.175 million ton for 2024 and 2030; Indian Point nuclear capacity and energy are replaced by 1,400 MW Gas Turbine units at Indian Point plant location, 6,791 MW of wind generators in upstate New York as identified in the NYISO Wind Study, and 1,400 MW offshore wind off Long Island, 1,000 MW solar PV distributed to all zones in New York. The combinations of resources have been selected to approximately provide equivalent replacement capacity and energy in this scenario, as well as the High Gas Turbine scenario.
  • High Gas Turbine (HiGT): Ginna, Fitzpatrick, and Indian Point nuclear units retired before 2024; CPP is a constraining factor in non-RGGI states; RGGI CO2 emissions are kept flat post-2020 at 78.175 million ton for 2024 and 2030; Indian Point capacity and energy are replaced by 2,500 MW Gas Turbine units at Indian Point plant location, 4,250 MWs of wind generators in upstate New York as identified in the NYISO Wind study, and 750 MW solar PV distributed to all zones in New York.

Under the assumptions and conditions studied for 2024, compliance with the CPP Initial Period can be achieved within either a mass-based or rate-based state plan, said the study. 

The study noted that significant work remains to fully evaluate potential changes in resources and networks, including:

  • Resource Adequacy
  • Transmission Security
  • System Stability
  • Extreme weather analysis
  • Simulations for 2030
  • Sub-hourly simulation

The schedule from here is for these preliminary results to be presented at a July 5 meeting, Nov. 15 for a Draft Phase II Report, and Dec. 15 for a Final CPP Study Report.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.