British Columbia ends long-idle review of South Meager geothermal project

The British Columbia Environmental Assessment Office, as part of a recent campaign to get rid of long-dormant environmental approval applications, on June 10 terminated a review that’s been inactive since 2005 for a possible 100 MW-200-MW geothermal project.

The office, in a June 24 letter to the developer, advised of that termination. The letter was to: Shane Downey, Chief Financial Officer, Polaris Infrastructure Inc., 2700 – 2 Bloor St W, Toronto ON M4W 3E2, sdowney@polarisinfrastructure.com.

Western GeoPower Corp. (WGP) in December 2004 had filed an updated project description with the office, which was close to the last activity that happened in the approval process. Through its wholly owned subsidiary, Meager Creek Development Corp., it said it held a 100% interest in the South Meager Geothermal Project located 150 kilometers north of Vancouver, British Columbia. The project area is located approximately 55 kilometers northwest of the Village of Pemberton in the Upper Lillooet watershed.

The project description said that GeothermEx of Richmond, California, a recognized authority on geothermal energy, had concluded that the South Meager Geothermal Project had the potential to support a minimum 100 MW power plant and has a “probable” capacity of 200 MW. It was anticipated that power from the South Meager Geothermal Project would be sold in western Canada although it is possible it might be sold in the western United States.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.