NextEra pursues 103-MW Eight Point Wind project in New York

Eight Point Wind LLC, which plans to submit an application with the New York State Public Service Commission to construct the 103.4-MW Eight Point Wind Energy Center, on March 29 filed with the commission a final Public Involvement Program (PIP) plan that outlines the attendant public involvement process in the application. 

Eight Point Wind is an affiliate of NextEra Energy (NYSE: NEE) out of Florida.

Eight Point Wind is planning the project to have a maximum generating capability of 103.4 MW from an estimated 32 wind turbines located on land leased from owners of private property located in the Towns of Canisteo, Greenwood, Hartsville, Hornellsville, Jasper, Troupsburg and West Union in Steuben County, New York. It is named the Eight Point Wind Project due to the eight points of the cardinal compass rose representing the seven local communities and the county.

Project facilities will include commercial-scale wind turbines, access roads, buried (and possibly overhead) electric collection lines, a project collection substation, meteorological towers, an operation and maintenance (O&M) building, and electrical interconnection facilities. Eight Point Wind anticipates the interconnection facilities will include a 115-kV switchyard built adjacent to the New York State Electric & Gas 115-kV Bennett Substation (both located outside of the municipal boundary of the City of Hornell, entirely in the Town of Hornellsville), and an overhead 115-kV interconnection line approximately nine miles long.

Eight Point Wind began conducting PIP activities during the pre-application phase in October 2015, and these public involvement activities will continue throughout the Article 10 review process until the project begins commercial operation.

A project contact is: Ryan Pumford, Project Developer, Ryan.Pumford@nexteraenergy.com, (561) 694-5036.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.