Invenergy’s Bethel Wind Farm lodges exempt generator notice at FERC

The Bethel Wind Farm LLC affiliate of Invenergy Wind LLC on Jan. 20 filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission a notice of self-certification that it is an exempt wholesale generator.

Bethel is developing and plans to construct, own and operate an up to 276-MW (nameplate) wind project that will be located in Castro County, Texas. Bethel will sell electric energy, capacity and/or ancillary services from the Bethel Project exclusively at wholesale. The Bethel Project is estimated to begin test power operations in the future, said the notice, without giving specifics about the timeline.

Through interconnection facilities in which Bethel will own interests, the Bethel Project will be interconnected with the transmission system owned by Southwestern Public Service Co.

While Bethel is currently an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Invenergy Wind, Invenergy Wind may in the future own only partial indirect interests in Bethel, the filing noted.

Bethel Wind Farm on Jan. 20 also filed an application with FERC for approval of its market-based rate authority. In that filing it said that the Bethel Project is estimated to possibly begin generating test power in the second quarter of 2016. The electric interconnection facilities that Bethel plans to own will consist of 34.5 kV collection lines and related facilities, and a 115 kV collection line substation, transformers and related disconnect switches and facilities.

The company noted a number of power project companies associated with Invenergy, with these being the ones with in-development projects:

  • Beech Ridge Energy II LLC (BR II) is developing and plans to construct, own and operate wind facilities of up to 52.5 MW (nameplate) that will be located in Greenbrier and Nicholas counties, West Virginia. The BR II Project will be interconnected with the transmission system owned by Allegheny Power and controlled by PJM Interconnection, through the interconnection facilities in which BR II plans to own interests. The BR II Project has not yet begun operations and is estimated to begin test power operations in the future. BR II is an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Invenergy Wind.
  • Bishop Hill Energy III LLC (BH III) is developing and plans to construct, own and operate wind facilities consisting of up to 136 MW (nameplate) that will be located in Henry County, Illinois. BH III plans to interconnect the BH III Project to the transmission system owned by Ameren Illinois and controlled by the Midcontinent Independent System Operator. The BH III Project has not yet begun operations and is estimated to begin test power operations in the future. BH III is an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Invenergy Wind.
  • Grand Ridge Energy V LLC (GR V) is developing and plans to construct, own and operate wind facilities of up to 80 MW (nameplate) that will be located in LaSalle County, Illinois. The GR V Facility will be interconnected with the transmission system owned by Commonwealth Edison and controlled by PJM. The GR V Facility has not yet begun operations and is estimated to begin test power operations in the future. GR V is an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Invenergy Wind.
  • Prairie Breeze Wind Energy III LLC is constructing and will own and operate an up to 35.8 MW (nameplate) wind project that will be located near Petersburg, Nebraska. The PB III Project will be interconnected with the transmission system owned by the Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) and operated by NPPD. The PB III Project is estimated to possibly begin generating test power in the first half of 2016. Prairie Breeze III is an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Invenergy Wind.
About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.