Nearly 3,000 MW of new capacity has gone into operation lately in ERCOT

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas said in a Dec. 1 report that about 2,987 MW (installed) of new capacity has come on-line in its region in recent months.

The following Planned Resources have been moved to Operational Status since the release of the May 2015 Capacity, Demand and Reserces (CDR) report:

  • Panda Temple II Power combustion turbine generator 1, Bell County, gas, 191.2 MW;
  • Panda Temple II Power combustion turbine generator 2, Bell County, gas, 191.2 MW;
  • Panda Temple II Power steam turbine generator, Bell, gas, 334.7 MW;
  • Ector County Energy CTG 1, Ector County, gas, 147.0 MW;
  • Ector County Energy CTG 2, Ector County, gas, 147.0 MW;
  • Briscoe Wind, Briscoe County, wind, 149.8 MW;
  • Green Pastures Wind 1, Knox County, wind, 150.0 MW;
  • Green Pastures Wind 2, Knox County, wind, 150.0 MW;
  • Hereford Wind G, Deaf Smith County, wind, 99.9 MW;
  • Hereford Wind V, Deaf Smith County, wind, 100.0 MW;
  • Logans Gap Wind I U1, Comanche County, wind, 103.8 MW;
  • Logans Gap Wind I U2, Comanche County, wind, 106.3 MW;
  • Longhorn Wind North U1, Floyd County, wind, 100.0 MW;
  • Longhorn Wind North U2, Floyd County, wind, 100.0 MW;
  • Rattlesnake Den Wind Phase 1 G1, Glasscock County, wind, 104.3 MW;
  • Rattlesnake Den Wind Phase 1 G2. Glasscock County, wind, 103.0 MW;
  • Route 66 Wind, Carson County, wind, 150.0 MW;
  • South Plains Wind 1, Floyd County, wind, 102.0 MW;
  • South Plains Wind 2, Floyd County, wind, 98.0 MW;
  • Spinning Spur 3 (Wind 1), Oldham County, wind, 96.0 MW;
  • Spinning Spur 3 (Wind 2), Oldham County, wind, 98.0 MW; and
  • Stephens Ranch Wind 2, Borden County, wind, 164.7 MW.

ERCOT noted that it did not factor into the Dec. 1 CDR the potential resource capacity impacts of several U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations that are being implemented or have been proposed, the most immediate of which is the forthcoming Regional Haze Program Final Rule establishing a Federal Implementation Plan (FIP) for Texas. This rule is expected within the next several months, and, as proposed, would require scrubber upgrades or retrofits at 12 coal-fired units in ERCOT with a 2018-2020 compliance period.

ERCOT’s recent regulatory impact analysis, which focused on the Clean Power Plan (CPP) and the proposed Regional Haze Federal Implementation Plan (FIP) for Texas, indicated that at least 4,700 MW of coal generation is likely to be retired as a result of these regulations. Depending on the requirements in the final Regional Haze FIP, these retirements may occur within the next five years. These retirements are in addition to 2,300 MW of gas-steam and coal capacity (including the announced mothballing of CPS Energy’s J.T. Deely units 1 and 2 in late 2018) that the analysis found would retire under business as usual conditions.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.