Texas agency nears final permit decision on gas-fired Eagle Mountain project

Eagle Mountain Power Co. LLC is nearing a final decision from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) for issuance of a Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Air Quality Permit that would authorize construction of the Eagle Mountain Steam Electric Station located in Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas.

This application was submitted to the TCEQ in November 2014, which is around the time that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency turned over greenhouse permitting in Texas to the state agency. The TCEQ executive director has determined that the emissions of air contaminants from the proposed facility which are subject to PSD review will not violate any state or federal air quality regulations and will not have any significant adverse impact on soils, vegetation, or visibility, said a Nov. 18 notice posted to the TCEQ website on Nov. 23. All air contaminants have been evaluated, and best available control technology will be used for the control of these contaminants.

The executive director has completed the technical review of the application and prepared a draft permit which, if approved, would establish the conditions under which the facility must operate.

The Eagle Mountain Steam Electric Station (EMSES) will include two natural gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine generators (CTG) equipped with heat recovery steam generators (HRSG), natural gas-fired dry low NOx (DLN) combustors, and natural gas-fired duct burner (DB) systems. Ancillary equipment includes natural gas piping and metering equipment, a natural gas-fired auxiliary boiler, a diesel emergency generator, a diesel firewater pump engine, and circuit breakers.

The facility will consist of either two General Electric (GE) 7FA.05 gas-fired combustion turbines nominally rated at 210 MW, or two Siemens SGT6-5000F(5)ee gas-fired combustion turbines nominally rated at 231 MW. Either model chosen will be equipped with a HRSG and DB with a maximum design capacity of 349 million British thermal units per hour (MMBtu/hr). The gross nominal output of the CTG with a HRSG and duct burners is 310 MW for the GE configuration and 350 MW for the Siemens configuration.

The auxiliary boiler will have a maximum heat input of 73.3 MMBtu/hr and will be limited to brief periods of time between startups and shutdowns, as well as during startup to allow for shorter startup times. The boiler may also be used to prevent freezing of equipment during cold weather conditions.

The 1,340-hp diesel-fired emergency generator will be installed to provide electricity to the station in case of power failure. It will be limited to 100 hours of non-emergency operation per year. The 282-hp diesel fired fire water pump will be installed in case of fire and will be limited to 100 hours of non-emergency operation per year.

Listed project contact information is: Eagle Mountain Power Co. LLC, Paul Coon, Air Permitting, Manager Environmental Services, (214) 875-8376, 1601 Bryan St., Dallas, Texas 75201-3401.

This is one of several new gas-fired projects that Energy Future Holdings has been permitting for when it emerges from bankuptcy and if the power markets justify any of these projects. The company currently has a plan before its bankruptcy court that would turn its power generating assets over to creditors.

In its March 31 annual Form 10-K statement, Energy Future said about new gas capacity permitting: “In 2013 and 2014, the TCEQ granted air permits to Luminant to build two natural gas combustion turbine generation units totaling 420 MW to 460 MW at each of Luminant’s existing DeCordova, Tradinghouse and Lake Creek generation facilities. In 2014 and 2015, Luminant filed air permit applications with the TCEQ to build two natural gas combustion turbine generation units totaling 420 MW to 460 MW at each of its existing Valley and Permian Basin generation facilities. In 2014, Luminant filed air permit applications with the TCEQ to build a combined cycle natural gas generation unit totaling 730 MW to 810 MW at each of its existing Eagle Mountain and DeCordova generation facilities. In 2015, Luminant filed an air permit application with the TCEQ to build two combined cycle natural gas generation units totaling 1460 MW to 1620 MW at its Tradinghouse generation facility. The proposed combined cycle natural gas generation units would be an alternative to the natural gas combustion turbine generation units at DeCordova and Tradinghouse.

“We believe current market conditions do not provide adequate economic returns for the development or construction of these facilities; however, we believe additional generation resources will be needed in the future to support electricity demand growth and reliability in the ERCOT market.”

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.