Revised interconnects worked out for two First Solar projects in California

Southern California Edison on Oct. 13 filed at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission an amended Large Generator Interconnection Agreement with North Rosamond Solar LLC, the developer of a 153-MW project, and the California Independent System Operator.

North Rosamond Solar had applied to the CAISO to interconnect its proposed 153-MW solar photovoltaic facility named the North Rosamond Solar Project, located in Kern County, California, to SCE’s Whirlwind 220-kV Substation.

The initial LGIA was accepted for filing by FERC on Feb. 4 of this year. During the negotiation of the original LGIA, a portion of the facilities required to interconnect the project were anticipated to be shared with another generation project in the interconnection queue, described as the CAISO Queue #643AJ Project. The generator interconnection agreement for the CAISO Queue #643AJ Project was being negotiated at the same time as the LGIA for the North Rosamond project; however, it was uncertain whether either interconnection customer would execute its respective agreement. As such, the original LGIA obligated North Rosamond to pay all of the costs of the required facilities, but included a commitment to amend the LGIA following the effective date of the interconnection agreement for the CAISO Queue #643AJ Project to reflect the sharing of the facilities and associated costs.

It has subsequently been determined that some of the North Rosamond facilities can also be shared with two other generation projects in the CAISO generation interconnection queue, Queue #746 and Queue #971. The parties have agreed to amend the LGIA to reduce costs, payments and financial security requirements by reflecting the sharing of the cost of the interconnection facilities and to reflect updated information.

The targeted commercial operation date for the North Rosamond project is still Dec. 15, 2016.

SCE also filed with FERC on Oct. 13 an amended Large Generator Interconnection Agreement with Willow Springs Solar LLC and CAISO. Willow Springs had applied to the CAISO to interconnect its proposed 100-MW solar photovoltaic facility named the Willow Springs 2 Project, located in Kern County, California, to SCE’s Whirlwind 220-kV Substation. The original LGIA was accepted by FERC on March 24.

During the negotiation of the original LGIA, a portion of the facilities required to interconnect the project were anticipated to be shared with another project in the interconnection queue, described as the CAISO Queue #643R Project. The generator interconnection agreement for the CAISO Queue #643R Project was being negotiated at the same time as the LGIA for the Willow Springs 2 project; however, it was uncertain whether either interconnection customer would execute its respective agreement. As such, the original LGIA obligated Willow Springs 2 to pay all of the costs of the required facilities, but included a commitment to amend the LGIA following the effective date of the interconnection agreement for the CAISO Queue #643R Project to reflect the sharing of the facilities and associated costs

It has subsequently been determined that some of these facilities can also be shared with two other generation projects in the CAISO generation interconnection queue: Queue #746 and Queue #971. The parties have agreed to amend the LGIA to reduce costs, payments and financial security requirements by reflecting the sharing of the costs.

The Willow Springs 2 project’s commercial operation date is also still Dec. 15, 2016.

A project contact in both cases is: Jack Pigott, Director, Business Development, First Solar Development, Jack.pigott@firstsolar.com.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.