PSEG permits turbine exchange between Burlington and Kearny plants

PSEG Fossil LLC is permitting a turbine exchange program for its Burlington Generating Station, with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection taking comment until Nov. 1 on air permit changes covering that plan.

The power plant is located in Burlington, N.J. This air permit modification would allow the exchange of General Electric LM6000PC turbines at PSEG Burlington Generating Station with other GE LM6000PC turbines with a maximum heat input rate of no greater than 463 MMBtu/hr subject to these conditions:

  • The exchange turbine will have identical horsepower, heat rate, and allowable emissions as the original turbine that is exchanged.
  • The exchange program shall not exceed a 15-year period from the date of issue of this modification.

Buried in the draft air permit change is this explanation: “PSEG Fossil LLC (PSEG) is submitting this minor permit modification application to the Burlington Generating Station (Burlington) Title V Operating Permit (BOP130002) for the ability to exchange LM6000 turbines between Burlington Unit No. 12 (U15), Kearny Generating Station (Kearny) Unit No. 12 (U14), and Kearny Units No. 13 and 14 (U13).”

The department is also out for comment until Nov. 1 on the companion air permit change for the Kearny plant, located in the town of Kearny, Hudson County, N.J.

A permit document for this permitting says it covers: “Exchange any of the six GE LM6000PC turbines at PSEG Kearny Generating Station with other GE LM6000PC turbines, with a maximum heat input rate of no greater than 493 MMBtu/hr, subject to the following conditions”:

  • The exchange turbine will have identical horsepower, heat rate, and allowable emissions as the original turbine that is exchanged.
  • The exchange program shall not exceed a 15-year period from the date of issue of this modification.
About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.