Southern to test and evaluate 1-MW battery project in Georgia

Southern (NYSE:SO) said Sept. 17 that it will test and evaluate a 1-MW (2-MWh) battery storage system in Cedartown, Ga., using lithium-ion battery technology – similar to the battery chemistry in electric vehicles and many of today’s consumer electronics.

The Cedartown research demonstration was created by Southern Company in collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in order to develop a large, utility-scale lithium-ion battery system and evaluate how battery storage systems can create value for customers.

The Cedartown battery demonstration is located on the site of a 1-MW solar photovoltaic (PV) facility owned and operated by WGL Energy. The solar PV facility is part of Southern subsidiary Georgia Power’s Advanced Solar Initiative (ASI).

Georgia Power’s innovative ASI programs have allowed the company to add hundreds of megawatts of cost-effective solar generation in Georgia without putting upward pressure on customer rates. Batteries are provided by LG Chem, one of the world’s largest lithium-ion battery manufacturers.

Southern dedicated its commitment to research and development of the new technology at a ceremony that included industry leaders and local dignitaries.

As a national leader in innovation, Southern Company recognizes the value for customers of inventing the future of energy,” said Southern Company Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Kimberly S. Greene. “With the new Cedartown battery demonstration, we are taking an important step forward in the research, development and deployment of energy storage technologies that create better ways to deliver clean, safe, reliable and affordable power to the families we serve.”

About Wayne Barber 4201 Articles
Wayne Barber, Chief Analyst for the GenerationHub, has been covering power generation, energy and natural resources issues at national publications for more than 20 years. Prior to joining PennWell he was editor of Generation Markets Week at SNL Financial for nine years. He has also worked as a business journalist at both McGraw-Hill and Financial Times Energy. Wayne also worked as a newspaper reporter for several years. During his career has visited nuclear reactors and coal mines as well as coal and natural gas power plants. Wayne can be reached at wayneb@pennwell.com.