Pennsylvania agency extends approvals for Hummel Station power plant

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection said in three notices in the May 30 Pennsylvania Bulletin that it has extended, to June 29, 2018, the expiration date for three air qualiity permits it had issued to Hummel Station LCC for a gas-fired power plant to be built at the site of Sunbury coal plant.

Those extensions, granted on May 18, cover:

  • Hummel Station was approved to extend authorization for the construction and operation of the combined cycle natural gas-fired turbine electrical generating facility. The project consists of the construction of three natural gas fired combined cycle turbines controlled by a selective catalytic reduction units and oxidation catalyst, a natural gas-fired auxiliary boiler to assist with start-up and shut down and a natural gas fired heater at a facility located in Shamokin Dam Borough, Snyder County.
  • Hummel Station was approved to extend authorization for the construction of the combined cycle natural gas-fired turbine generating facility. The project consists of the construction and operation of three natural gas fired combined cycle turbines controlled by a selective catalytic reduction units and oxidation catalyst, a natural gas fired auxiliary boiler to assist with start-up and shut down and a natural gas fired heater at the facility in Shamokin Dam Borough. This sounds similar to the first approval, but is under a different permit number.
  • Hummel Station had its authorization extended for the construction and operation of a mechanical draft cooling tower as part of the combined cycle natural gas-fired turbine project at this facility.

Panda Power Funds had announced on Feb. 17 that it has entered into a joint venture with Sunbury Generation LP to develop, finance, construct and operate this plant. The Hummel Station facility will occupy an 18-acre parcel of the 192-acre Keystone Opportunity Expansion Zone at the site of the recently-retired Sunbury coal-fired plant. Hummel Station is expected to be one of the largest coal-to-gas conversion projects in the United States. The new plant is expected to supply large power markets, including Philadelphia and New York City, when it enters commercial operations in the second half of 2017.

The facility’s access to Marcellus Shale gas through the Marc I, Regency and Transcontinental regional gas pipelines is expected to provide Hummel Station with a significant operating cost advantage, Panda noted. The plant will interconnect to the pipelines through a 35-mile lateral that will be constructed by a subsidiary of UGI Energy Services.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.