FERC issues enviro review on Dominion upgrade of Pennsylvania-Ohio gas pipeline

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on June 2 put out for comment until July 2 an environmental assessment (EA) for the Lebanon West II Project, proposed by Dominion Transmission Inc.

Dominion Transmission (DTI), which is part of Dominion Resources (NYSE: D), requests authorization to: replace 11 non-contiguous segments of its 26- and 30-inch-diameter TL-400 Pipeline totaling about 10.2 miles; add a 10,915-horsepower compressor unit to an existing compressor station; and install other compressor station and gate assembly facilities. Dominion also proposes to increase the maximum allowable operating pressure (MAOP) of these pipeline segments from 745 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) to 848 psig.

The project would allow Dominion to transport an additional 130,000 dekatherms per day from Dominion’s MarkWest Liberty Bluestone Interconnect in Butler County, Pa., to Dominion’s Lebanon-Texas Gas Interconnect in Warren County, Ohio.

On Sept. 30, 2014, DTI filed this application, covering:

Pipeline Facilities (TL-400 Pipeline)

  • Segment 14 – abandon in-place about 2,647 feet, abandon by removal about 8,420 feet, and construct about 11,067 feet of 26-inch-diameter replacement pipeline, of which about 1,821 feet would be constructed in new right-of-way, in Coshocton and Tuscarawas Counties, Ohio.
  • Segment 15 – abandon in-place about 664 feet, abandon by removal about 1,434 feet, and construct about 2,098 feet of 26-inch-diameter replacement pipeline in Tuscarawas County.
  • Segment 16 – abandon in-place about 1,654 feet, abandon by removal about 4,159 feet, and construct about 5,813 feet of 30-inch-diameter replacement pipeline in Tuscarawas County.
  • Segment 17 – abandon in-place about 5,139 feet, abandon by removal about 3,418 feet, and construct of about 10,082 feet of 30-inch-diameter replacement pipeline, of which about 3,500 feet would be constructed in new right-of-way, in Harrison County, Ohio.
  • Segment 19 – abandon in-place about 1,805 feet, abandon by removal about 6,243 feet, and construct about 8,048 feet of 30-inch-diameter replacement pipeline in Carroll County, Ohio.
  • Segment 20 – abandon in-place about 1,413 feet, abandon by removal about 3,708 feet, and construct about 5,121 feet of 30-inch-diameter replacement pipeline in Carroll County.
  • Segment 21 – abandon by removal about 1,709 feet, and construct about 1,709 feet of 30-inch-diameter replacement pipeline in Columbiana County, Ohio.
  • Segment 22 – abandon in-place about 920 feet, abandon by removal about 3,277 feet, and construct about 4,197 feet of 30-inch-diameter replacement pipeline in Columbiana County.
  • Segment 24 – abandon in-place about 897 feet, abandon by removal about 2,714 feet, and construct about 3,611 feet of 30-inch-diameter replacement pipeline in Columbiana County.
  • Segment 25 – abandon in-place about 151 feet, abandon by removal about 951 feet, and construct about 1,102 feet of 30-inch-diameter replacement pipeline in Columbiana County.
  • Segment 27 – abandon by removal about 986 feet, and construct about 986 feet of 30-inch-diameter replacement pipeline in Beaver County, Pennsylvania.

Aboveground Facilities

  • Rural Valley Compressor Station – Install a new 10,915-hp Solar Taurus 70S combustion turbine and a 3.5 million British thermal units per hour (MMBtu/hr) boiler that would replace an existing 2.1 MMBtu/hr boiler at the Rural Valley Compressor Station, in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. In addition, DTI would install one new gas cooler, one new filter separator, a blowdown separator/silencer, new suction/discharge tie-ins, and expand the existing compressor building to accommodate the new compressor unit.
  • Newark Compressor Station – Install additional regulation at the existing Newark Compressor Station in Licking County, Ohio to reduce the pressure in the TL-400 Pipeline as the gas flows west from the compressor station.
  • Beaver Compressor Station – Install additional regulation at the existing Beaver Compressor Station in Beaver County, Pennsylvania to allow additional gas to flow from the TL-400 Extension 1 Pipeline into the TL-400 Pipeline.
  • Washington Compressor Station – Install four new valves and 30-inch- diameter steel crossover piping at the existing Washington Compressor Station in Fayette County, Ohio.
  • Coxcomb Gate Assembly – Install a new relief valve on the existing LN-25 Pipeline at the existing Coxcomb Gate Site in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

FERC noted that the Allegheny Defense Project environmental group has requested that the commission prepare a regional programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS) to analyze the impacts of shale gas extraction and transportation in the northeastern United States. Allegheny stated that FERC should consider the Clarington Project, Lebanon West II Project, and New Market Project in the same EIS as the Monroe to Cornwell Project; that all of these projects share similar purpose, geography and timing; that for example, the projects are about increasing capacity for Marcellus and Utica shale gas production; that the projects also share similar geography in that they are all designed to increase capacity for transportation of Marcellus and Utica shale gas produced in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia; that the projects also share similar timing because the proposed in-service date for all of them is Nov. 1, 2016; and that FERC is reviewing them at the same time.

Said the EA issued June 2: “We neither dispute that the Clarington, Lebanon West II, New Market, and the Monroe to Cornwell Projects would take advantage of new Marcellus and Utica Shale production, nor that the requested in-service date for the projects is November 1, 2016. Geographically, the four projects are non-contiguous, but are separated by a minimum of 50 miles. The nearest proposed Lebanon West II Project facility to the New Market Project is about 140 miles away. Further, there is nothing particularly unusual about a November 1, 2016 in-service date, as November 1 is the approximate time of year when the winter heating season begins. Lastly, none of the projects share a common point of delivery for the gas. Consequently, the projects provide independent utility and do not constitute a single project for review by the Commission.”

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.