Two affiliated companies seek North Carolina approvals for 5-MW solar projects

Two affiliated companies, Ellington Solar I LLC and Ellington Solar II LLC, filed March 12 applications with the North Carolina Utilities Commission for Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity on one 5-MW solar project apiece.

The applications are on the letterhead for Entropy Solar Integrators.

The Ellington Solar I facility will be a 5-MW (ac) ground-mounted solar electric photovoltaic array consisting of 20,670 310-watt Canadian Solar CS6P modules, 7 x Solectria SGJ 500XTM inverters, and 2 x Solectria SGJ 750XTM inverters. It will be located at 1487 Warrenton Road at Henderson in Vance County.

The projected cost of the Ellington Solar I facility is $6.8 million. The projected date on which the facility will come on line is in December 2015. The applicant plans to enter into a fixed rate contract with Duke Energy Progress.

The Ellington Solar II project will be a 5-MW (ac) ground-mounted photovoltaic array consisting of 20,900 310-watt Canadian Solar CS6PX modules and 10 x Solectria SGJ 500XTM inverters. The project location is on Carey Chapel Road at Henderson in Vance County.

The projected cost of this second facility is also $6.8 million. The projected date on which the facility will come on line is in December 2015. The applicant plans to enter into a fixed rate contract with Duke Energy Progress.

The contact address for both companies is: 14120 Ballantyne Corporate Place, Suite 400, Charlotte, NC 28277, (980) 297-2881, ID@entropysolar.com.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.