FERC readies four Mississippi hydro projects for environmental review

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on March 16 issued four notices on original major license applications from FFP Missouri 2 LLC, an affiliate of Boston-based Free Flow Power, on hydroelectric projects in the southeast U.S.

The notices mean that these applications have now been accepted for filing and are ready for environmental analysis, with a final environmental assessment document for each project due out in mid 2016.

Those notices, by project, cover:

Sardis Lake Hydroelectric Project

This is a November 2013 application from FFP Missouri 2 for the Sardis Lake Hydroelectric Project. The proposed project would be located at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (Corps) existing Sardis Lake Dam,on the Little Tallahatchie River, near the Town of Sardis, Panola County, Mississippi.

The proposed Sardis Lake Project would consist of the following new facilities: a 510-foot-long, 15.5-foot-diameter steel liner installed within the existing outlet conduit; a 50-foot-long, 30-foot-wide (varies) steel-lined, concrete bifurcation chamber containing two hydraulically-operated gates used to control the amount of flow diverted from the existing stilling basin to the powerhouse; a 250-foot-long, 15.5-foot-diameter steel penstock; a 78-foot-wide, 50-foot-long, 102.6-foot-high steel and reinforced concrete forebay housing trashracks and a fish bypass gate; a 120-foot-long, 85-foot-wide concrete powerhouse containing two vertical Kaplan turbine-generator units having a combined installed capacity of 14.6 MW; a 200-foot-long, 100-foot-wide tailrace; an 887-foot-long, 4.16-kV buried cable; a substation; and a 6,210-foot-long, 161-kV overhead transmission line extending from the substation to a utility-owned distribution line. The average annual generation would be 52,000 megawatt-hours.

Grenada Lake Hydroelectric Project

This is also a November 2013 application from FFP Missouri 2. The Grenada Lake Hydroelectric Project would be located at the Corps’ existing Grenada Lake Dam on the Yalobusha River, near the Town of Grenada, Grenada County, Mississippi.

The proposed Grenada Lake Project would consist of these new facilities: a 327.5-foot-long, 16-foot-diameter steel liner installed within the existing outlet conduit; a 50-foot-long, variable width steel-lined, concrete bifurcation chamber containing two hydraulically-operated gates used to control the amount of flow diverted from the existing stilling basin to the powerhouse; a 260-foot-long, 14-foot-diameter steel penstock; a 78-foot wide, 50-foot-long, 86-foot-high steel and reinforced concrete forebay housing trashracks and a fish bypass outlet gate; a 120-foot-long, 60-foot-wide concrete powerhouse containing two vertical Kaplan turbine-generator units having a combined installed capacity of 9 MW; a 150-foot-long, 70-foot-wide tailrace; a 670-foot-long, 4.16-kV buried cable; a substation; and a 1,980-foot-long, 12.5-kV overhead transmission line extending from the substation to a utility-owned distribution line. The average annual generation would be 31,000 megawatt-hours.

Enid Lake Hydroelectric Project 

There was also a November 2013 license application from FFP Missouri 2 for the Enid Lake Hydroelectric Project, to be located at the Corps’ existing Enid Lake Dam, on the Yocona River near the town of Oakland, in Yalobusha County, Mississippi.

The proposed Enid Lake Project would consist of these new facilities: a 320-foot-long, 10.25-foot-diameter steel liner installed within one of the two existing outlet conduits; a 50-foot-long, 20-foot-wide (varies) steel-lined, concrete bifurcation chamber containing two hydraulically-operated gates used to control the amount of flow diverted from the existing stilling basin to the powerhouse; a 240-foot-long, 10-foot-diameter steel penstock; a 55-foot wide, 50-foot-long, 100-foot-high steel and reinforced concrete forebay housing trashracks and a fish bypass gate; an 80-foot-long, 50-foot-wide concrete powerhouse containing two vertical Kaplan turbine-generator units having a combined installed capacity of 4.6 MW; a 150- foot-long, 75-foot-wide tailrace; a 181-foot-long, 4.16-kV buried cable; a substation; and a 2,036-foot-long, 12.5-kV overhead transmission line extending from the substation to a utility-owned distribution line. The average annual generation would be 17,700 megawatt-hours.

Arkabutla Lake Hydroelectric Project

And there was a November 2013 license application from FFP Missouri 2 for the Arkabutla Lake Hydroelectric Project, to be located at the Corps’ existing Arkabutla Lake Dam on the Coldwater River, near the town of Hernando in Tate and DeSoto counties, Mississippi.

The proposed Arkabutla Lake Project would consist of these new facilities: a 325-foot-long, 15.5-foot-diameter steel liner installed within the existing outlet conduit; a 50-foot-long, varying width steel-lined, concrete bifurcation chamber containing two hydraulically-operated gates used to control the amount of flow diverted from the existing stilling basin to the powerhouse; a 272-foot-long, 12-foot-diameter steel penstock; a 60-foot wide, 50-foot-long, 83-foot-high steel and reinforced concrete forebay housing trashracks and a fish bypass gate; an 80-foot-long, 46-footwide concrete powerhouse containing two vertical Kaplan turbine-generator units having a combined installed capacity of 5.1 MW; a 200-foot long, 85-foot-wide tailrace; a 1,574-foot-long, 4.16-kV buried cable; a substation; and a 2,712-foot-long, 12.5-kV overhead transmission line extending from the substation to a utility-owned distribution line. The average annual generation would be 19,000 megawatt-hours.

An applicant contact is: Ramya Swaminathan, Rye Development, 745 Atlantic Avenue, 8th Floor, Boston, MA 02111, telephone (617) 804-1326.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.