Oregon Clean Energy seeks changes for Ohio gas-fired project

Oregon Clean Energy LLC applied Feb. 10 at the Ohio Power Siting Board for approval of same fairly minor revisions to prior board approvals of its gas-fired, combined-cycle power project located near Toledo.

For example, the revision application says:

  • “The original application stated that one of the buildings to be included at the Site was a 16-cell cooling tower. Instead, the cooling tower is composed of 11 cells in a single row arrangement instead of the 16 cells in double-wide arrangement as described in the original application. Any changes that impact air permitting have already been incorporated into the air permits-to-install and docketed.”
  • “The original application stated, ‘The major equipment at the Facility will include two CTGs with natural gas as the fuel, evaporative coolers for inlet air cooling, two three-pressure level HRSGs, two duct burners, and one reheat, condensing STG. The Project will utilize a 16-cell cooling tower and a steam surface condenser. An auxiliary gas-fired steam boiler will be used for heating steam to accommodate a faster Facility startup.’ The cooling tower is composed of 11 cells in a single row arrangement instead of the 16 cells in double-wide arrangement as described in the original application. Therefore, it will be approximately half the width of the original proposal. Any changes that impact air permitting have already been incorporated into the air permits-to-install and docketed.”
  • “Following construction, impacts will remain minimal. The original application filing stated, ‘Operational impacts on air quality will be minimized through the use of efficient new gas turbine technology, and incorporating dry low nitrogen oxide (DLN) combustors, oxidation catalysts and selective catalytic reduction (SCR).’ For clarification, Siemens is providing Ultra Low NOx (ULN) combustors. DLN combustors are the precursor technology to ULN combustors. Siemens Power Generation incorporated material and technological design advancements, industry-leading design engineers, and state of the art design tools to develop a DLN combustion system in the 1990’s. Dry Low NOx technology provides reduced NOx emissions through a staged combustion process and unique temperature and heat release strategy. Further improving the environmental compatibility of Siemens Power Generation fleet of gas turbines, the Dry Low NOx technology has evolve into a combustion system, commercially offered as ‘Ultra Low NOx’ (ULN), which is designed to achieve even lower NOx emissions.”

The Feb. 10 filing said other aspects of the project would remain the same, including the project schedule.

This is the second set of changes related to a May 2013 approval for this project from the board. Last October, the board approved a first set of changes.

The original approval allowed the company to construct a natural gas fired, combined-cycle plant with a 799-MW capacity. The plant is to be built on a 30-acre parcel of land in Oregon in Lucas County, Ohio, with commercial operation estimated to begin in May 2016. The board last October approved two changes. The first change would permanently relocate the electrical switchyard to a 7.5-acre parcel of land adjacent to the current property. The second change would be the addition of a temporary construction trailer and parking lot also on land adjacent to the current property.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.