Duke Energy Indiana seeks extra MATS time for Wabash River units

The Indiana Office of Air Quality (OAQ) is out for comment until March 23 on a permit modification requested by Duke Energy Indiana for an extra year, until April 2016, on compliance with the federal Mercury and Air Toxics Standards for the coal-fired units at the Wabash River plant.

On Jan. 13, Duke Energy Indiana applied for the one-year extension for Wabash River Units 2-6 from the basic MATS compliance deadline on April 16 of this year. Unit 1 was repowered in the 1990s with an integated gasification combined cycle system, while the remaining units are still conventional coal-fired facilities. The following is a list of the emission units and pollution control devices for which an extension of compliance would be granted:

  • One wall fired coal electric utility boiler (pulverized-dry bottom), identified as Unit 2, constructed in 1953, using #2 fuel oil as ignition fuel, with a nominal rated heat input capacity of 913.8 million BTU per hour, using modified burner design (low NOx) for NOx control and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for particulate control, exhausting to Stack A. Stack A is equipped with a continuous opacity monitor (COM) to monitor opacity as well as continuous emission monitors for NOx, CO2, SO2, and volumetric flow rate.
  • One wall fired coal electric utility boiler (pulverized-dry bottom), identified as Unit 3, constructed in 1954, using #2 fuel oil as ignition fuel, with a nominal rated heat input capacity of 922.9 million BTU per hour, using modified burner design (low NOx) for NOx control and ESP for particulate control, exhausting to Stack A.
  • One wall fired coal electric utility boiler (pulverized-dry bottom), identified as Unit 4, constructed in 1955, using #2 fuel oil as ignition fuel, with a nominal rated heat input capacity of 922.9 million BTU per hour, using modified burner design (low NOx) for NOx control and ESP for particulate control, exhausting to Stack A.
  • One wall fired coal electric utility boiler (pulverized-dry bottom), identified as Unit 5, constructed in 1956, using #2 fuel oil as ignition fuel, with a nominal rated heat input capacity of 1096.2 million BTU per hour, using modified burner design (low NOx) for NOx control and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for particulate control, exhausting to Stack A.
  • One tangential fired coal electric utility boiler (pulverized-dry bottom, tangential), identified as Unit 6, constructed in 1968, using #2 fuel oil as ignition fuel, with a nominal rated heat input capacity of 2999.0 million BTU per hour, using modified burner design (low NOx) for NOx control and ESP for particulate control, exhausting to Stack A.

The Midcontinent Independent System Operator filed in December 2014 at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission a revised Generator Interconnection Agreement that covers the planned retirement in April 2016 of four of these units at Wabash River. The agreement is among Duke Energy Indiana, Duke Energy Business Services LLC as agent for Duke Energy Indiana, and MISO. Said the filing about the revision: “This change recognizes the unique factual circumstance that the Interconnection Customer has submitted to MISO an Attachment Y Definitive Retirement Notice and the units have been approved for retirement effective April 16, 2016.”

The affected units, installed at the Wabash River Station in West Terre Haute, Indiana, are:

  • Unit 2, 85 MW, Steam Turbine, Coal
  • Unit 3, 85 MW, Steam Turbine, Coal
  • Unit 4, 85 MW, Steam Turbine, Coal
  • Unit 5, 95 MW, Steam Turbine, Coal

Duke has said that the coal-fired Wabash River Unit 6 is being evaluated for a conversion to natural gas. Duke Energy Indiana committed to retire or convert these Wabash River units by June 2018 in conjunction with a settlement associated with the 618-MW Edwardsport coal gasification project air permit. The Edwardsport project went into commercial operation in June 2013.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.