AMP re-permits a number of diesel engines for peak shaving duty

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency put out for comment on Jan. 5 an air permit that would allow American Municipal Power to use six existing diesel-fired engines as peak shaving facilities at its Cleveland Generating Station.

American Municipal Power (AMP) owns and operates this facility located in Cleveland in Cuyahoga County. The proposed federally enforceable permit-to-install and operate covers six existing diesel-fired generator engines, each rated at 20.02 million BTU per hour (Caterpillar 3516B model), which have been in operation since July 2000. These engines are currently being managed as emergency use engines subject to the Permit-by-Rule (PBR) for emergency generators because the company decided it was not cost effective to retrofit these engines to meet the applicable requirements of a federal rule prior to the compliance deadline for that rule.

“However, AMP is now requesting to change the use of these engines back to peaking engines because market conditions have pushed power prices to the point where substantial savings can be realized through peak shaving,” said an Ohio EPA permit document. “At the same time, the cost to retrofit existing [compression ignition] CI diesel engines for [National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (RICE)] compliance has fallen significantly. Therefore, AMP has decided to proceed with retrofitting these CI engines with diesel oxidation catalyst for RICE NESHAP compliance and re-permit them with a restriction on hours of operation to avoid major stationary source and major Title V source status as well as state modeling and [Best Available Technology] requirements for NOx.”

Under this permit, the maximum annual operating hours for each emissions unit shall not exceed 300 hours per rolling, 12-month period. The permittee shall burn only diesel fuel, containing no greater than 0.0015% sulfur by weight, in each emissions unit.

The Ohio EPA on Jan. 5 also put out for comment six other draft permits responding to similar applications from AMP. They cover:

  • AMP owns and operates an existing power generation facility located at Omega JV2-Napoleon. This federally enforceable permit-to-install and operate covers three existing diesel-fired generator engines, each rated at 20.02 million BTU per hour, which have been in operation at this facility since May 1999. These engines are currently being managed as emergency use engines subject to the PBR for emergency generators. AMP is now requesting to change the use of these engines back to peaking engines because market conditions have pushed power prices to the point where substantial savings can be realized through peak shaving.
  • AMP owns and operates an existing power generation facility located at Omega JV2-Napoleon. This federally enforceable permit-to-install and operate covers three existing diesel-fired generator engines, each rated at 20.02 million BTU per hour, which have been in operation at this facility since June 2001. These engines are currently being managed as emergency use engines. AMP is now requesting to change the use of these engines back to peaking engines because market conditions have pushed power prices to the point where substantial savings can be realized through peak shaving.
  • AMP owns and operates an existing power generation facility located at Omega JV2-Edgerton. This federally enforceable permit-to-install and operate covers two existing diesel-fired generator engines, each rated at 20.02 million BTU per hour, which have been in operation at this facility since July 2000. These engines are currently being managed as emergency use engines. However, AMP is now requesting to change the use of these engines back to peaking engines.
  • AMP owns and operates an existing power generation facility located in Jackson Center, Shelby County. This federally enforceable permit-to-install and operate covers one existing diesel-fired generator engine, rated at 20.02 million BTU per hour, which has been in operation at this facility since May 1999. This engine is currently being managed as an emergency use engine. However, AMP is now requesting to change the use of this engine back to peaking engine.
  • AMP owns and operates an existing power generation facility located at Omega JV2-Shelby. This federally enforceable permit-to-install and operate covers one existing diesel-fired generator engine, which is rated at 20.02 million BTU per hour, which has been in operation at this facility since October 1999. This engine is currently being managed as an emergency use engine. AMP is now requesting to change the use of this engine back to peaking engine.
  • AMP owns and operates an existing generation facility at the intersection of Interstate 76 and State Route 3 in Seville, Ohio (Medina County). This federally enforceable permit-to-install and operate covers three existing diesel-fired generator engines, each rated at 20.02 million Btu per hour, which have been in operation at the facility since June 2000. The engines are currently being managed as emergency use engines. However, AMP is now requesting to change the use of these engines back to peaking engines.
About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.