Duke gets North Carolina approvals for three large solar projects

Duke Energy (NYSE: DUK) said Dec. 8 that it has received regulatory approval from the North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC) to acquire and construct three large solar facilities in eastern North Carolina.

The three projects are part of Duke Energy’s $500m solar expansion announced in September, which also includes buying power under purchase power agreements from five other new solar projects in both the Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress service territories.

Located in Bladen, Duplin and Wilson counties, the three sites owned by Duke Energy will provide energy and renewable energy certificates to benefit Duke Energy customers as cost-effective components of the company’s portfolio to comply with the N.C. Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard.

“We are pleased the NCUC has approved the company’s request to build these facilities,” said Rob Caldwell, Duke Energy’s senior vice president for distributed energy resources. “These projects will help provide significant amounts of cost-effective renewable energy to benefit our customers, comply with our state obligations and provide meaningful investments in the communities we serve.”

The projects will begin construction in early 2015, and are expected to be completed by the end of 2015. The three projects will total 128 MW of capacity. Overall, Duke Energy’s expansion totals 278 MW of new solar capacity.

The three acquired projects include:

  • The 65-MW Warsaw Solar Facility in Duplin County. The Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) was transferred to Duke Energy from Strata Solar.
  • The 40-MW Elm City Solar Facility in Wilson County. The CPCN was transferred to Duke Energy from HelioSage Energy.
  • The 23-MW Fayetteville Solar Facility in Bladen County, near the Cumberland County border. The CPCN was transferred to Duke Energy from Tangent Energy Solutions.
About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.