N.Y. developer seeks exemption from PSC rules for heat and power project

Halletts Vendee LLC on Nov. 25 petitioned the New York State Public Service Commission for a declaratory ruling that its planned combined heat and power (CHP) project will be exempt from PSC rules.

The company plans to install this project in buildings that will be located on the Halletts Point Peninsula in Queens, New York. “Halletts respectfully requests that the Commission promptly rule on this Petition so that Halletts may proceed to secure appropriate funding for the CHP Facility and provide the services contemplated hereunder as expeditiously as possible,” the company added.

Halletts, a subsidiary of The Durst Organization Inc. (the owner, manager and builder of 13 million square feet of Manhattan office towers and 2 million square feet of residential rental properties), is the developer of a project on the East River waterfront in Queens known as Halletts Point. When complete, the Halletts Point project that will be served by the CHP Facility will consist of five new mixed-use buildings on or near the East River waterfront in Queens.

Current plans call for nearly 1,700 new residential units, 45,000 square feet of new retail space including a supermarket, a school, improved public transportation facilities and a new esplanade along the East River. The project will be done in phases, with Building #1 scheduled for completion in September 2017. When it is completed, the overall electrical load for the project is currently estimated to be 4.7 MW.

To supply the electricity and heating and cooling needs of tenants, Halletts proposes to create a highly reliable, redundant distributed microgrid that will beelectrically isolated from the local electric utility distribution system, the application said. The current configuration involves constructing one CHP plant within three of the five buildings.

  • CHP Plant #1 will be located in Building #1 and will consist of two 800 kW, one 400 kW, and two 800 kW (standby) natural gas fired reciprocating engines, one 250 ton absorption chiller, one 50 ton absorption chiller, three 400 ton multistack chillers, two 6 MMBH hot water boilers and either a 4,160V or 480V electrical system.
  • CHP Plant #2 will be located in Building #3 and will consist of two 800 kW natural gas fired reciprocating engines, one 250 ton absorption chiller, three 400 ton multistack chillers, two 6 MMBH hot water boilers and either a 4,160V or 480V electrical system.
  • CHP Plant #3 will be located in Building #4 and will consist of two 800 kW natural gas fired reciprocating engines, one 250 ton absorption chiller, two 400 ton multistack chillers, two 6 MMBH hot water boilers and either a 4,160V or 480V electrical system.

The company added: “The overall electric generating capacity of the CHP Facility will be 6.8 MW. Halletts will install electrical duct bank between each building to form a common 4,160V or 480V, 3 phase bus. This electrical duct bank will cover an overall distance of 1,200 feet. The reciprocating engines for the combined CHP facility will have black start capability and consist of six 800 kW gas generators, one 400 kW gas generator and two 800kW standby gas generators that will be available in the event one or two units are out of service(creating an N-2 configuration).”

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.