Hoosier Energy gets one-year MATS extension for Merom coal plant

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management on Nov. 13 approved a final air permit covering a one-year extension, to April 2016, for Hoosier Energy Rural Electric Cooperative to comply at the Merom coal plant with the federal Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS).

The initial MATS deadline is April 2015, but state agencies can grant one-year extensions under certain circumstances. The Nov. 13 air permit also covers installation of activated carbon injection systems on both Merom coal units for mercury emissions reduction.

The affected Merom coal units as described in the permit approval are:

  • “One (1) pulverized coal-fired dry bottom boiler, identified as Unit 1 or 1SG1, constructed in 1976, with an activated carbon injection system for control of mercury emissions permitted in 2014, rated at 5,088 million BTU per hour (MMBTU/hr) energy input, used to generate up to 490 megawatts (gross) of electricity. Unit 1 uses No. 2 fuel oil for start ups and flame stabilization. Unit 1 cannot operate at load solely using No. 2 fuel oil. Unit 1 utilizes the following control equipment: Activated Carbon Injection System (ACI), to be installed in 2015, SO3 Mitigation System (SBS Injection), Electrostatic precipitator (ESP), Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Wet Scrubber System (identified as CE1B), and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR).”
  • “One (1) pulverized coal-fired dry bottom boiler, identified as Unit 2 or 2SG1, constructed in 1976, with an activated carbon injection system for control of mercury emissions permitted in 2014, rated at 5,088 million BTU per hour (MMBTU/hr) energy input, used to generate up to 490 megawatts (gross) of electricity. Unit 2 uses No. 2 fuel oil for start ups and flame stabilization. Unit 2 cannot operate at load solely using No. 2 fuel oil. Unit 2 utilizes the following control equipment: Activated Carbon Injection System (ACI), to be installed in 2015, SO3 Mitigation System (SBS Injection), Electrostatic precipitator (ESP), Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Wet Scrubber System (identified as CE2B), and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR).”

At full load levels, the Merom power plant’s two generating units use more than 10,000 tons a day of coal from southwestern Indiana mines. Trucks and trains deliver coal to the plant.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.