FERC okays permits for Siting Renewables on two Pa. hydro projects

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on July 1 issued two preliminary permits to Siting Renewables LLC that allow the company three years in each case to look at the feasibility of two hydroelectric projects in Pennsylvania.

A license application will be needed if the company decides to pursue either of these projects beyond the feasibility stage.

In December 2013, Siting Renewables filed an application for a preliminary permit on the proposed Hepburn Street Dam Hydroelectric Project, to be located on the West Branch of the Susquehanna River near South Williamsport in Lycoming County, Pa. The Hepburn Street dam is owned by the state of Pennsylvania.

The proposed project would include nine channels, each with two 350-kW very low head turbines and generators, with a maximum generating capacity of 6.3 MW, and one 600-foot-long, 12.42/7.2-kV primary transmission line. The estimated annual generation of the Hepburn Project would be 33,100,000 kilowatt-hours.

Also in December 2013, Siting Renewables applied on the proposed Easton Dam Hydroelectric Project, to be located on the Lehigh River near Easton in Northampton County, Pa. The Easton dam is also owned by the state of Pennsylvania.

The proposed project would include two channels, each with three, 500-kW (kW) very low head turbines and generators with a maximum generating capacity of 3 MW, and 4,800-foot-long 12.42/7.2 kV primary transmission line. The estimated annual generation of the Easton Project would be 15,770,000 kilowatt-hours.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.