Toshiba wins turbine contract for Mexico repowering project

Toshiba Corp. (TOKYO: 6502) announced April 24 that it has been selected to supply thermal power generation equipment for the retrofit and modernization of the Altamira Thermal Power Plant in Tamaulipas State in northeastern Mexico.

Under the contract, Toshiba will supply Isolux Corsán with two high-efficiency 165-MW steam turbines and related equipment. Altamira is currently equipped with two 158-MW steam turbines and generators that Toshiba shipped to Comisión Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Mexico’s state-owned electricity utility, in the early 1970s.

CFE, the owner of Altamira, awarded an Isolux Corsán-led consortium an engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) contract for the retrofit and upgrade of the plant, including fuel conversion from oil to petroleum coke. The consortium consists of Isolux Ingeniería S.A., Isolux de México S.A de CV and Alstom Mexicana S.A. de CV.

Isolux awarded the steam turbine contract to Toshiba on the strength of the company’s comprehensive technological and supply capabilities and its experience in Mexico. Toshiba will deliver the equipment in 2016, and the upgraded power plant is scheduled to start commercial operation in 2017.

Mexico currently meets over 70% of its energy needs with thermal power, Toshiba noted. Under its 2013-2027 Energy Strategy, the country aims to generate cleaner and more efficient energy, and to achieve the balanced generation mix essential for ensuring a long-term, stable and secure power supply. In coming years, this plan, and investments in advanced new power plants, will support Mexico in further strengthening its energy independence.

Since entering the Mexico market in 1973, Toshiba has delivered 23 steam turbines and generators, including equipment for two combined-cycle projects—Valladolid, which started operation in 2006, and 264 CC Centro, now under construction.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.