First 41-MW phase of larger solar project goes on-line in Texas

The first phase of a 400-MW solar project is now operating in San Antonio, Texas, said OCI Solar Power on Dec. 18.

The 41-MW Alamo I solar farm is phase one of this 400-MW development, which is expected to make Texas one of the top solar producing states when complete. Alamo I will generate energy for 6,600 homes powered by CPS Energy. More than 167,000 solar panels cover the 450-acre solar farm.

“By 2020, 65 percent of our community’s electricity will come from resources that are low- or no-carbon emitting — reducing emissions in an amount that’s equal to removing more than a million cars from local roads,” said CPS Energy CEO Doyle Beneby. “Reducing pollutants in the air we breathe is a no-brainer, and we’ve been pleased to partner with OCI Solar Power in our efforts to make that happen.”

The 400-MW project resulted in the largest economic development agreement between a municipal utility and private company. The partnership will bring manufacturing, 800 permanent jobs and an annual economic impact of $700m to Texas. 

“Alamo I is an interesting milestone because it’s now the largest solar farm in Texas, but it’s still a small part of what is to come,” said OCI Solar Power President and CEO Tony Dorazio. “Alamo I is only step one to Texas’ rise as a big player in solar.”  

“San Antonio is fast becoming a leader in the New Energy Economy by combining economic development with environmentally sound practices,” San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro said. “This solar farm expands our clean energy portfolio while adding hundreds of 21st century manufacturing jobs to the local economy.”

Another solar project, Alamo II, will bring an additional 4.4 MW to San Antonio upon completion in early 2014.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.