Gulf Power nears permit for air control testing at Lansing Smith

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection has issued a draft permit that would allow Gulf Power to do a temporary test of air emissions-capture systems at the coal-fired Lansing Smith power plant.

On Oct. 18, Gulf Power applied to conduct a trial burn study in order to finalize a compliance strategy to meet the best available retrofit technology (BART) regional haze and Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) air quality reduction goals using several emissions control sorbent additives at Lansing Smith Units 1 and 2. The facility is located in Bay County at Southport, Fla. The draft permit was issued Nov. 1 and has been up for comment since then.

The final permit would authorize a test of several emissions control sorbent additives called hydrated lime, trona, and activated carbon at Lansing Smith. This test, using emission control additives to achieve emission reductions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), hydrogen chloride (HCl) and mercury (Hg) will evaluate engineering and design improvements at the facility.

  • Gulf Power would be authorized to temporarily install the delivery, conveyance, storage and spray systems associated with applying hydrated lime to the boiler, electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) or the ductwork in units 1 and 2.
  • The permittee would also be authorized to temporarily install the delivery, conveyance, storage and spray systems associated with applying the activated carbon to the boiler, ESPs or ductwork in units 1 and 2.
  • And, the permittee would be authorized to temporarily install the delivery, conveyance, storage and spray systems associated with applying trona to the boiler, ESPs or ductwork in units 1 and 2.

Units 1 and 2 have a common 199-foot stack and are equipped with this air pollution control and measurement equipment:

  • Hot and cold side electrostatic precipitators to control particulate matter (PM);
  • Low nitrogen oxide (NOX) burners and non-selective catalytic reduction (SNCR) systems to control NOX; and
  • Continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) to measure and record NOX and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions and a continuous opacity monitoring system (COMS) to measure and record the opacity of the exhaust gas.

Gulf Power, in an August report to the Florida Public Service Commission, projected these coal burn figures for 2014 at Lansing Smith:

  • Lansing Smith Unit 1 (162 MW), 288,661 tons; and
  • Lansing Smith Unit 2 (195 MW), 223,156 tons.
About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.