Salt River Project nears completion of big dam fix

Construction workers from the Salt River Project (SRP) and Seattle-based Global Diving & Salvage are in the final stages of a saturation diving project to repair damaged hydro facilities that may be the only one of its kind in the world.

Crews have completed the major project at Unit 4 before spending the next week finishing work on the intake structures for Units 1-3, SRP said in a Sept. 4 statement.

“We were faced with some tough choices, with a primary focus being the preservation of our valuable hydro generation pump-back unit,” said Roger Baker, a principal engineer in SRP’s Hydro Generation department and the project manager of the Horse Mesa Dam job.

He said SRP didn’t want to lower the reservoir level by 170 feet and essentially drain Apache Lake for this repair work, so it looked at several other options. The complicated project was prompted by a June 2012 collapse of a guide vane inside the penstock intake, which is the huge pipe that passes through the dam from Apache Lake into the generating unit below on the Canyon Lake side. The dam itself was unharmed and other structures remained sound.

This resulted in the shutdown of Unit 4 and the 119 MW produced by the pump-back unit that was added to the dam in 1972 – 45 years after dam completion. Horse Mesa’s generating units have the highest capacity of any of SRP’s dams – a combined 149 MW – and the loss of Unit 4 hampered the overall operation of SRP’s pumped-storage system.

SRP utilizes the pump-back system, which also includes a unit downstream at Mormon Flat Dam, to produce hydroelectricity by pumping it back into the upper reservoir when electricity demand and cost are low and then releasing the water through the generator when demand is high.

After a construction plan was selected, new structures for the dam had to be fabricated and a contractor that offers solutions for difficult projects such as at Horse Mesa Dam had to be selected. That’s where SRP’s Mechanical C&M (MCM) department, Global Diving & Salvage and Stantec, an engineering consulting firm that provided the options for evaluation and designed the repairs, came in.

Global Diving & Salvage early this year set up a huge working barge on Apache Lake next to the dam. Global Diving hauled 29 tractor trailer loads that included the barge system that supports the construction efforts as well as cranes, boats and other support features. Its 20- to 24-member crew working around the clock on the barge supports the divers working under water.

Global Diving’s crew used a specialized technique called “saturation diving,” where the divers breathe a blend of oxygen and helium, and stay under pressure for up to 30 days. This allows the divers to work at depth for much greater periods than conventional diving allows.

While one diver remained in the diving bell, the vessel that brought them from the work area 160 feet below the surface of Apache Lake to their pressured habitat vessel on the barge, the other worked a five-hour shift. Roles were then reversed for the other five hours. Ten hours later, the second two-man crew repeated the process. To have two crews working for about 20 hours a day for 30 days, the divers remained under pressure in their barge-located pressurized chambers, in the diving bell, or at the bottom of the lake.

The new vanes fabricated and assembled by SRP’s MCM department are carbon steel forms coated with corrosion protection that are filled by underwater concrete. Global Diving’s tasks on the project included anchoring and securing the steel forms that are fortified in place by filling them with a special non-aggregate concrete mixture especially developed for underwater placement.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.