Free Flow Power files late updates for six Tennessee hydro projects

Free Flow Power, acting on behalf of subsidiary Reliable Storage 1 LLC, on Aug 28 filed belated progress reports with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for six pumped storage hydro projects in Tennessee.

The preliminary permits for each of the six projects requires the filing with FERC of six-month update reports, and FERC had on Aug. 22 warned the company that the latest updates, the third to be filed for each project, were late.

“Since the issuance of Preliminary Permits in February 2012, FFP has engaged in a process of conducting research toward the development of Pre-Application Documents for the Projects,” the company said in the Aug. 28 updates. “FFP has prepared a consolidated draft Pre-Application Document for the Projects based on publicly available information and anticipates supplementing the draft with information obtained through stakeholder outreach to be conducted during the upcoming six-month period.”

The company added: “Concurrently, FFP has been investigating the financial feasibility of the Projects, including the need for storage and enhanced grid stability in the area of the Projects and the receptiveness of financial markets for financing Projects that will address that need. Discussions with prospective financial partners are ongoing.”

The projects, all of which would connect into the Tennessee Valley Authority system, are:

  • The Keaton Creek Pumped Storage Project to be located near the town of Sneedville, on Keaton Creek, in Hancock County, Tenn. The project would include a powerhouse/pumping station containing three pump/generating units, with a total generating capacity of 309 MW. The estimated annual generation of the Keaton Creek Project is 322 gigawatt-hours.
  • The Leech Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project to be located near the town of Tazewell, in Claiborne County, Tenn. The project would include a powerhouse/pumping station containing three pump/generating units, with a total generating capacity of 390 MW. The estimated annual generation of the project is 590 gigawatt-hours.
  • The Ravenscroft Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project to be located on Doe Creek, near the town of Ravenscroft in White and Putnam counties, Tenn. The project would include an underground powerhouse/pumping station containing three pump/generating units, with a total capacity of 600 MW. The estimated annual generation of this project is 1,000 gigawatt-hours.
  • The Horseshoe Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project to be located near Tazewell in Claiborne County, Tenn. It would include a powerhouse/pumping station containing three pump/generating units, with a total capacity of 331 MW. The estimated annual generation of the Horseshoe Mountain Project is 517 gigawatt-hours.
  • The Cross Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project to be located near the town of Lake City, in Campbell County, Tenn. The project would include a powerhouse/pumping station containing three pump/generating units, with a total capacity of 1,062 MW. The estimated annual generation is 2,761 gigawatt-hours.
  • The Bon Air Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project to be located on Wildcat Creek, near the town of Sparta in White County, Tenn. It would include an underground powerhouse/pumping station containing three pump/generating units, with a total capacity of 700 MW. The estimated annual generation is 1,100 gigawatt-hours.
About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.