Free Flow Power gets preliminary permits on two Okla. hydro projects

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on July 16 issued two notices that it has granted preliminary permits to affiliates of Boston-based Free Flow Power for hydro projects in Oklahoma.

A preliminary permit gives a project developer the 36-month exclusive right to explore the feasibility of a project, with a license application needed at FERC if the decision is to proceed with the project. The developer needs to file updates with FERC every six months for the term of the preliminary permit.

FERC also issued four July 16 notices that affiliates of Free Flow Power have applied for preliminary permits on other projects, with FERC inviting parties to comment on those applications, or to file competing proposals for a preliminary permit.

The projects with newly-approved preliminary permits are:

  • FFP Project 112 LLC is looking at the feasibility of developing the Chouteau Lock and Dam Project, which would be located at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Chouteau Lock and Dam on the Verdigris River in Wagoner County, Okla. The proposed project would include a powerhouse, located on the east side of the dam, containing two units with a total capacity of 11.6 MW. The proposed project would have an average annual generation of 36,900 megawatt-hours, and utilize surplus water from the Chouteau Lock and Dam, as directed by the Corps.
  • FFP Project 111 LLC is studying the feasibility of the Newt Graham Lock and Dam Project, which would be located at the Corps’ Newt Graham Lock and Dam on the Verdigris River in Wagoner County, Okla. The project would include a powerhouse containing two units with a total capacity of 10.1 MW. The project would have an average annual generation of 32, 300 megawatt-hours, and utilize surplus water from the Newt Graham Lock and Dam as directed by the Corps.

FERC on July 16 accepted for filing and is seeking comments on preliminary permit applications by:

  • FFP Project 123 LLC, which is looking at the feasibility of a project to be located at the Corps’ Amory Lock & Dam on the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway near the town of Amory in Monroe County, Miss. The project would include a powerhouse containing one unit with a total capacity of 1.5 MW. The project would have an average annual generation of 7,100 megawatt-hours and operate as directed by the Corps.
  • FFP Project 124 LLC, which wants to study the feasibility of a project to be located at the Corps’ Red River Lock & Dam #1 on the Red River near the town of Marksville in Catahoula Parish, La. The project would have a powerhouse containing four units with a total capacity of 36.8 MW. It would have an average annual generation of 163,200 megawatt-hours and operate as directed by the Corps.
  • FFP Project 130 LLC, which filed an application for a preliminary permit on a project to be located at the Corps’ Jonesville Lock & Dam on the Black River near the town of Jonesville in Catahoula Parish, La. The project would include a powerhouse containing three units with a total capacity of 6 MW. The project would have an average annual generation of 47,000 megawatt-hours and operate as directed by the Corps.
  • FFP Project 131 LLC, which wants a preliminary permit to study the feasibility of a project at the Corps’ Felsenthal Lock & Dam on the Ouachita River near the town of Felsenthal in Union County, Ark. The project would include a powerhouse containing two units with a total capacity of 5 MW. It would have an average annual generation of 18,000 megawatt-hours and operate as directed by the Corps.

Free Flow Power’s website said about projects like these: “Many of Free Flow Power’s proposed projects will use conventional technology to produce power on existing dams that do not currently have hydropower. Other projects, where there is sufficient naturally occurring head, would produce electricity by diverting a portion of a stream or river. These proposed projects are all ‘run-of-river’ and do not involve impounding or blocking the flow of the water.”

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.