First Mexico wind farm using GE turbines spins into action

General Electric (NYSE: GE), Comexhidro Viento, Next Energy de México and Conduit Capital announced July 24 the opening of Santa Catarina, the first operational wind farm in Mexico powered by GE turbines.

Eight GE 2.75-103 turbines are online and are expected to generate 45 GW annually. GE also was awarded a five-year agreement to operate and maintain the Santa Catarina wind farm.

“Thanks to this project, we will be able to supply electricity for the next 20 years and generate important saving to the counties, which currently need the money to restore their finances, improve public services and continue working on security issues in Monterrey,” stated Carlos Jinich, general manager, Comexhidro.

The Santa Catarina wind farm is a result of a joint effort between Comexhidro Viento, Next Energy de México and Conduit Capital.

“We are proud to be a part of the Santa Catarina wind farm and bring advanced renewable energy technology to Mexico,” said Anne McEntee, president and CEO of GE’s renewable energy business. “This project marks the beginning of the potential our customers see for wind energy in the country.”

The 2.75-103 turbine is part of GE’s evolutionary technology portfolio, which builds on the success and the global experience of GE’s 21,000 wind turbines installed globally.

Eólica Santa Catarina is a partnership formed by Next Energy of Mexico, Conduit Capital Partners and Comexhidro Viento. These companies are focused on wind energy projects for Nuevo Leon and have major plans for the development of new projects.

Grupo Comexhidro is focused on the development, construction and operation for renewable electricity generation projects. Nowadays, wind projects and hydroelectric power station are under operation and producing 172 MW.

About Barry Cassell 20414 Articles
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy’s Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication’s editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University.