GE’s advanced gas turbine technology to increase flexibility and efficiency and reduce emissions for new power plant in Texas

GE’s advanced power generation technology has been selected for a project near Marble Falls, Texas, that will replace an aging, less efficient power plant with a flexible, higher efficiency combined-cycle (1) power plant that offers reduced fuel use, emissions and water consumption for the power it generates.

When the plant begins commercial operation, expected in the summer of 2014, it will be the first combined-cycle plant in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) region that meets the latest Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Greenhouse Gas regulations.

GE will supply two Frame 7FA Gas Turbine-Generators in a two-on-one combined-cycle plant, along with installation and commissioning and technical assistance, to Fluor Corporation /quotes/zigman/272126/quotes/nls/flr FLR -1.03% , the engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) contractor for the Ferguson Replacement Project. GE will manufacture the turbines in Greenville, S.C., the generators in Schenectady, N.Y., and develop the control system in Salem, Va. GE’s manufacturing work at the three sites will involve more than 8,000 employees. The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), a public utility, will own and operate the new 540-megawatt facility, which is replacing the 420-megawatt, 37-year-old Thomas C. Ferguson Power Plant at the site.

“This new, advanced technology combined-cycle power plant will use significantly less fuel than the gas-fired plant it is replacing,” said Michael McCluskey, manager of LCRA Generation Resource Development. “The plant will provide a more efficient, cleaner source of electricity for the community, and the project construction will make a significant contribution to the area’s economy.”

“Our advanced 7FA Gas Turbine technology is more efficient, has fewer emissions and offers greater operating flexibility than previous technologies,” said Paul Browning, president and CEO–Thermal Products for GE Energy. “It is an excellent match for LCRA’s requirements for a project that will bring numerous energy, environmental and economic benefits to the region.”

Browning added, “There are many opportunities in the U.S. today similar to the LCRA project to replace older plants, both gas-fired and coal-fired. With our 7FA technology, we are well positioned to help customers cut CO2 emissions by as much as 50 percent.”

Responding to the diverse challenges of today’s world–such as integrating ever-growing levels of intermittent renewable energy into the grid–energy developers are looking to build gas-fired power plants that combine high levels of operating flexibility with fuel efficiency. The GE Frame 7FA Gas Turbine offers expanded operational flexibility with fast start capability, high ramping rates and extended emissions-compliant turndown, enabling power plant operators to satisfy both their energy production and environmental goals.

GE’s 7FA Gas Turbines use proven technology and provide 15 percent of North America’s electricity capacity. More than 750 GE 7FA Gas Turbines are operating worldwide and have compiled more than 25 million fired hours. According to Operational Reliability Analysis Program (ORAP) data, these machines have compiled operating reliability of 99.7 percent and starting reliability of 98.8 percent with 95.9 percent availability.